Is sleep better than naps?

Usually, short naps do not affect the quality of night sleep for most people. However, if you have insomnia or poor quality sleep during the night, taking a nap could make these problems worse.

Is sleep better than naps?

Usually, short naps do not affect the quality of night sleep for most people. However, if you have insomnia or poor quality sleep during the night, taking a nap could make these problems worse. Long or frequent naps may interfere with nighttime sleep. Basically, it's easier for employers to figure out how to nap their workers to increase production than, for example, pay them more so they can live in a place where it's easier to sleep at night.

Experts say that the relaxation that occurs at bedtime and rest improves mood, whether you fall asleep or not. Sleep deprivation is easy to misdiagnose and may not even be the reason for the infamous afternoon fall. This period of time allows you to quickly rest without getting into a slow-wave dream and feeling excessively dazed after waking up. However, it turns out that my kindergarten-inspired habit could be an evidence-based strategy, because research has suggested that, for some, implementing a daytime nap might be even more beneficial than increasing sleep hours at night.

Those who practice two-phase sleep usually sleep for a long time at night, 5 to 6 hours, and have a shorter period of sleep or nap during the day. If you nap too close to bedtime, you can cause insomnia or lack of sleep and start a cycle of sleep deprivation. A short nap can be refreshing and restorative, especially if you're not sleepy, but longer naps at the end of the day can adversely affect the quality and duration of sleep. You sleep during the day to make up for the loss of sleep at night, but then you have a harder time falling asleep at night because you slept during the day.

However, another person can lead a productive and healthy life with 5 hours of sleep per night with a short nap or naps during the day. When I asked Weiss if it was better to sleep an extra hour at night or take a nap during the day, she said, “It depends on who needs the nap. In addition to considering your natural circadian rhythm and sleep momentum, scheduling your naps correctly also requires an understanding of sleep architecture and the different components of your sleep cycle. Similarly, many of the coping mechanisms for coping with lack of sleep may be a cause of lack of night sleep or of a lower quality.

If you are poor and live in a crowded city, there is little you can do about the amount of light and noise that is created around you, and the researchers who participated in the study simply couldn't control all the variables involved in achieving quality sleep.

Sue Ashauer
Sue Ashauer

General food junkie. Extreme zombie buff. Extreme coffee trailblazer. Hipster-friendly travel guru. Devoted food trailblazer. Tv buff.

Leave a Comment

All fileds with * are required