The Effects of Sleeping During the Day Instead of Night

Find out what happens if you choose to sleep during the day instead of night. Learn about potential health risks associated with sleeping during the day.

The Effects of Sleeping During the Day Instead of Night

A recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) revealed that staying awake at night and sleeping during the day, even for a 24-hour period, can quickly lead to changes in more than 100 proteins in the blood, including those that have an effect on blood sugar, immune system, and metabolism. There are various reasons why people may need to sleep during the day, such as occasional naps, shift work, or chronic health conditions. However, it is not recommended to sleep for long periods during the day if it can be avoided. Shorter periods of daytime sleep are acceptable, as long as they don't affect the quality and duration of nighttime sleep.Unfortunately, there is a lot of misinformation about sleep that is spread online, on social networks or through word of mouth.

Some of these false beliefs are repeated so often that they become widely accepted myths. Even though these myths about sleep are contrary to scientific evidence, they are still believed by many people and can lead to poor sleep habits and insufficient sleep. This is especially dangerous because it gives a positive spin to excessive daytime sleepiness, which is usually a symptom of insomnia, lack of sleep, or an underlying sleep disorder such as sleep apnea.Sleeping at any time can also be linked to circadian rhythm disorders and narcolepsy. Another important effect of total lack of sleep is daytime sleepiness.

The brain and body are used to having a rest period, and when forced to miss this recovery time, it's natural to have episodes of sleepiness. Sleep deprivation can also cause microsleeps, which involve falling asleep briefly for a few seconds.The best way to deal with sleepy driving is to prevent it first by getting a good night's sleep before traveling. Drinking alcohol before going to bed can alter your sleep cycles, increase the chances of sleep interruption, and worsen snoring and sleep apnea. For those who don't work shifts or have an underlying medical condition, daytime sleep most often takes the form of a nap.

Significant numbers of teens, including up to 72% of high school students, are not getting enough sleep.As a result, even if you seem to be getting used to getting too little sleep, in reality more serious health problems can accumulate due to the body's inability to rest what it needs. After a night of sleep deprivation, most people feel a strong need to return to normal sleeping patterns, often allowing them to regain their previous sleeping pattern. Virtually everyone experiences negative impacts from lack of sleep but not everyone feels the effects in the same way or to the same extent. Sleep quality is another critical factor to consider and it is closely related to avoiding sleep interruptions.The greater the lack of sleep, the greater the adverse health effects such as weight gain, heart disease, diabetes and even strokes.

By keeping participants' diet and activity levels constant throughout the study researchers were able to determine that insufficient sleep and sleeping at abnormal times were directly responsible for reducing metabolism and increasing blood sugar levels.For those who have no choice but to sleep during the day there are ways to maximize potential benefits and minimize potential negative effects. The recommendations from a group of experts commissioned by the National Sleep Foundation state that adults should get between seven and nine hours of sleep each night.Sleep is vital for proper functioning of the body and completely skipping a night's rest can damage your thinking and cognition, your mood and emotions as well as your physical well-being.

Sue Ashauer
Sue Ashauer

General food junkie. Extreme zombie buff. Extreme coffee trailblazer. Hipster-friendly travel guru. Devoted food trailblazer. Tv buff.

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