Do Women Need More Sleep Than Men?

Recent research has shown that women may need more sleep than men due to various factors such as quality of sleep, depression, alcohol consumption, hormones, nocturia, lifestyle choices and parenthood.

Do Women Need More Sleep Than Men?

Do women need more sleep than men? This is a question that has been asked for many years, and the answer is not as straightforward as it may seem. Recent research has shown that women may need more sleep than men, but why? And how much more sleep do women need? In this article, we will explore the findings of a recent UK study to answer these questions and more. When it comes to quality of sleep, studies have generally found that people sleep better alone than with a partner. However, for couples, sharing a bed can provide a sense of security and calmness that can help promote better sleep.

Insomnia is more commonly associated with depression, and approximately 15% of people with depression may sleep too much. This can worsen depression, as regular sleep habits are important for recovery. On average, sleeping more than 9 hours a night can do more harm than good.Research has found that people who slept longer had more calcium buildup in the arteries of the heart and less flexibility in the arteries of the legs. This prompted UK researchers to delve deeper into the gender differences in sleep to uncover the answers.

The study found that lack of sleep was more associated with high levels of distress, hostility, depression and irritability in women than in men. It also showed that sleepiness in women presents differently than in men.The study also revealed that excessive alcohol consumption is more common in men and can interfere with sleep architecture and reduce quality. Adults should take into account gender differences when considering their own sleep needs and incorporate information about attempts to increase sleep. Depression and low socioeconomic status were also associated with prolonged sleep.Researchers believe this is due to the effect that too much sleep has on certain neurotransmitters in the brain, including serotonin.

Evidence suggests there is a complex relationship between obesity, sleep and male hormones, but more research is needed to clarify this connection. Nocturia (frequent nighttime urination) affects more than 75% of women over 40 due to higher rates of incontinence and overactive bladder in women.Men's sleep is also significantly more restricted than women's due to time spent in unpaid jobs and full-time work. However, men earn a little more time to sleep if they nap and lose a little less if they go to bed late. Sleep deprivation alters brain hormones (leptin and ghrelin) that control appetite, and some evidence suggests that women quickly develop a “sleep debt” after a period of poor sleep.Gender differences in sleep time could be due to differences in the composition of time spent in paid and unpaid work by gender and age.

Parenthood involves more unpaid work which could limit sleep time for both genders, but it may also indicate the acceptability of reducing paid work time for women, increasing their ability to preserve sleep. In conclusion, recent research has shown that women may need more sleep than men due to various factors such as quality of sleep, depression, alcohol consumption, hormones, nocturia, lifestyle choices and parenthood. It is important for adults to take into account gender differences when considering their own individual needs for adequate rest.

Sue Ashauer
Sue Ashauer

General food junkie. Extreme zombie buff. Extreme coffee trailblazer. Hipster-friendly travel guru. Devoted food trailblazer. Tv buff.

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